How CFPB’s Amendment to TRID Affects Your Business

TRID mazeThe Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) finalized an amendment to the TILA/RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule (TRID) that has been in effect since October of 2015. While the rule makes no changes to the Loan Estimate or Closing Disclosure forms or their timelines for delivery, there are some items in the amendment that may affect your business processes, and we’ll take a quick look at them here.

  1. Information sharing with parties to the transaction: The new rule makes it clear that the borrower’s Closing Disclosure may be shared with other parties to the transaction (i.e. the real estate agent and the seller.) This codifies long-established practice in many States, and removes uncertainty that was thrown into the mix when the original TRID rule was promulgated. The CFPB is working on additional specific guidance on providing separate CD forms to the borrower and seller. NOTE: this Federal regulation will not change practices in any State that might explicitly prohibit such sharing of information at the state level.
  2. Housing Assistance / HFA Loans: In the final rule, the CFPB provides guidance that certain loans made by housing finance agencies and other non-profit housing groups will retain their partial disclosure exemption from the TRID rule even when recording fees and transfer taxes are charged to the borrower. The CFPB hopes that this will increase the number of these transactions that receive the exemption, thereby increasing the number of such loans made.
  3. Co-Op Loans to be Covered by TRID: The new rule extends the scope of TRID to cover all loans made on cooperative housing units (“Co-Ops”), where the buyer is technically buying into the Corporation running the housing project instead of purchasing real property in the traditional sense. Co-ops are quite prevalent in the New York metropolitan area, as well as elsewhere on the East Coast, and this change will probably have more impact on general business processes than the others listed here.
  4. Tolerance for Total of Payments Disclosure: Under the old TIL disclosure, the total of payments box was calculated specifically using the finance charge. With the roll-out of TRID, the marriage between finance charge and this disclosure was removed, but no accuracy tolerances were put in place. This rule changes that by adding an accuracy tolerance to the total of payments disclosure that mirrors the one that has been in place for the finance charge itself.

Finally, the CFPB also put out another request for comment on a proposal to address when creditors specifically may use a Closing Disclosure (instead of a Loan Estimate) to determine if a charge was disclosed in good faith. The uncertainty around acceptable situations for this has created what many compliance officers call the “black hole” – especially when closings are delayed. See the CFPB Website for more information.

The mandatory compliance date for all provisions of the rule listed above is OCTOBER 1, 2018.

Happy Originating,

Peter



Real Estate Institute offers top-rated Mortgage Loan Originator Continuing Education and Pre-License courses in all three formats: Classroom, Live Webinar and Online, Self-Study. These courses were designed BY loan originators FOR loan originators covering topics you need to know to navigate today’s ever-changing lending landscape.

Is the CFPB Finally Listening on TRID?

TRID maze
According to the folks over at National Mortgage Professional Magazine, the CFPB has quietly begun drafting a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. For those unfamiliar with the process, this is the first step in issuing a new or revised administrative rule, and typically opens the door for public comments on the topic at hand before the rule is actually drafted/released.

In this case, the topic at hand is the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule – or TRID – which totally revamped the mortgage disclosure process beginning in October of 2015. Since the new rules took effect, lenders have been struggling to comply with what they believe the CFPB wants, which in some areas is still unclear as the CFPB has not issued formal written guidance on many topics.

While there are positives that have come out of TRID – namely the effectiveness of the simplified Loan Estimate form that replaced the GFE for most transactions – there also have been many speedbumps. For example, many technology providers lagged behind in releasing updates to origination, document preparation and other software, which led to lenders issuing non-compliant Loan Estimates and Closing Disclosures. In fact, recently Moody’s estimated that up to 90% of loans originated in the first few months of the rule’s effective date contained at least one TRID-related defect.

A large mortgage lender – W.J. Bradley – closed its doors in March after being unable to sell a large number of loans with TRID compliance issues. This event, along with consistent industry prodding for help in understanding CFPB expectations through formal written guidance may have led to Director Cordray’s decision to revisit the rules.

While the NMP article indicates a “possible TRID rewrite,” I wouldn’t expect a massive overhaul of the key components that we’re becoming accustomed to in the origination community – namely the Loan Estimate and Closing Disclosure. Instead, what I believe is likely to happen is a clarifying tweak to some of the more confusing areas of the regulation, such as the sections dealing with construction and other non-traditional lending products, and (fingers crossed) significantly more written industry guidance to help us understand what we need to do to comply with CFPB expectations. If this is the case, that should make the secondary market (especially in the nonconforming space) much more comfortable in purchasing loans, which should result in an easing of credit availability and – one would hope – a reduction in loan turn-times which skyrocketed industrywide after October 1, 2015. It also may lead to a long-term reduction in compliance costs, which would make many small and midsized players in our industry very, very happy.

More on this as it develops. Until then, happy originating!

Peter

BREAKING NEWS: TRID Delayed

TRID Deadline ExtendedIn response to what the CFPB claims was a “technical error in the regulatory process” – but likely has everything to do with continued concern from creditors about their ability to implement and guarantee compliance with the new disclosure rules by August 1 – the effective date of the new Loan Estimate and Closing Disclosure has been delayed two months to October 1, 2015.

Many lenders are calling TRID the biggest change in the mortgage industry since the 1960s. Understanding the new TILA-RESPA integrated disclosures is critical for anyone working with the real estate industry, from loan originators to real estate agents, to real estate attorneys.

Real Estate Institute has been offering courses for mortgage loan originators that provide an in-depth look at the disclosure changes for a year. The newest course designed to prepare Illinois attorneys who support both buyers and sellers of residential real estate has been very popular. New TRID course content for Illinois real estate agents will be released this summer.