Can You Expect a Hike in the Fannie/Freddie Guarantee Fee in Your State?

The Federal Housing Finance Agency (the agency tasked with overseeing the Fannie and Freddie conservatorship) has announced that it intends to hike the guarantee fee on all loans sold to the agencies secured by properties in the states with the highest cost of foreclosure.  Those states are:  Illinois, Florida, Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.  This fee hike would go into effect in 60-90 days (it needs to be formally published in the Federal Register first for public comment), and means that loan originators will likely see a worsening in pricing on loans made on properties in these states in roughly 45 days.  Once the notice is published, you’ll have a chance to comment on the proposal at www.regulations.gov.  It’s worthwhile to make your voice heard, so take a few minutes and give them your thoughts on the matter!  You just need to wait until after the notice is officially published.

Happy originating!

ILLINOIS MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATORS: Do You Engage in Loan Modification Activities?

Just a reminder that the state of Illinois has amended the Residential Mortgage License Act to impose a registration requirement on all state-licensed Mortgage Loan Originators who also engage in loan modifications.  If you are engaged in any loan modification activities on properties located within Illinois, you must register with the state by completing a one-question questionnaire on the IDFPR’s website.  The URL for the questionnaire is  http://www.obre.state.il.us/MLOSurvey/.

If you perform loan modification activities, you MUST register online by the deadline of December 22, 2012.  There are no additional fees or requirements above and beyond registration.

**Also, Illinois now considers loan modifications a licensable activity.  In order to perform loan modifications on properties located in the state of Illinois, you must hold a valid Mortgage Loan Originator license or be otherwise exempt from licensure. **

The Residential Mortgage License Act defines loan modification as “for compensation or gain, either directly or indirectly offering or negotiating on behalf of a borrower or homeowner to adjust the terms of a residential mortgage loan in a manner not provided for in the original or previously modified mortgage loan.”  (Amended via HB 4521, effective August 3, 2012)